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Search Results 76 to 108 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)
from australia to the u.s., to britain. >> thank you very much for joining us. in mumbai today, three coordinated bombings targeted the financial capital leaving at least 21 people dead and injuring more than a hundred. the blasts are the worst attack in the country since the 2008 attack. we have been to the location of why the explosions. >> this is one of three locations where explosions have taken place. just behind this police cordon, a bus stop where a vehicle was detonated. two of their class took place at about 7:00 p.m. local time in highly densely populated areas. lots of traffic around peak times. we are hearing of many injuries. the injured have been taken to local hospitals. the party according to the police and those of been coming to these areas saying that the parties at the moment is to make sure that the injured are taking care of. it is yet to be unknown who is behind these attacks and what is taking place and whether there is collation to any of those attacks that took place in 2008. -- whether there is any correlation to any of those attacks that took place in 2008
can make a splash. she switched last year from representing kenya to start swimming for great britain. her goal is to be at the olympics. she often trains two times a day, once before school and once after. >> getting up at 5:00 in the morning is not get easier. >> she started swimming at the age of four when she was with her family. she was born in the u.k. and decided to return here to pursue her dream. she boarded at plumas college. -- plymouth college. while most teenagers find it hard to drag themselves out of bed in the morning, she has been years since the crack of dawn. she is incredibly committed to his swimming but she is focused on her school work. after a cup of coffee, it is off to school where she is studying for her a levels. she has her work to perfect and friends to catch up with. this is all before the end of school. >> sometimes i get really stressed and fed up. you have to deal with this situation that you are given and you have to deal with both of these things. >> she made a contentious start before representing england. she has struggled. she took a five week br
target. al qaeda is trying to hit softer, more powerful role targets other than america and britain. >> tonight, soldiers are on the streets of oslo and norway's government is holding crisis meetings. there is shock that the city's peace could be shattered like this. >> and just a brief time ago, president obama spoke about these attacks with the new zealand -- with new zealand's prime minister. >> i want to personally extend my condolences to the people of norway, and it is a reminder that the entire international community has a stake in preventing this kind of terror. we have to work cooperatively both on intelligence and in terms of prevention. >> joining me now to discuss the motivation of who might have been behind the attacks as the former u.s. deputy national security adviser who is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> why would note -- norway bbea target for attacks? >> it is a peaceful country, but it has become more and more a target for global jihadists. norway since the days of 2001, 2002 they have
this wall. >> the berlin wall did come down, of course. today, britain's saluted ronald reagan. the foreign secretary brought a message from lady thatcher who hoped to attend but was not well enough to attend. >> ronald reagan was a great president and a great man. he held clear principles and acted upon them with purpose. >> his legacy was hailed by connolly's arise as an example for today, particularly in the middle east. >> it gives us hope and optimism to continue to stand for those who are still trapped in tyranny. "the reputation of some leaders fade with time but for reagan, it seems to be the reverse. critics during his presidency regarded him as a second division actor who had no business trying to play a part on the world stage. ronald reagan has certainly found a place in the sun. >> on this july 4th, to all our american viewers, happy independence day. that you so much for watching. see you back here tomorrow. -- thank you so much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont,
scandal which continues to spread in great britain. "news of the worldwent even further = = -- "news of the world" went even further, according to gordon brown. >> there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon at downing street. on the top is rebekah brooks. for years, team brown stayed close to teamer, but no more -- team murdoch, but no more. he is accusing "news of the world" of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> i had my bank account broken into, my files, i tax returns went missing -- my tax returns went missing. medical return -- medical records have been broken into. i do not know how this happens. but i do know that in two of these instances, there is absolute proof that news international was responsible for hiring people to get this information. the people that they work with -- and this is what concerns me most -- our criminals. >> are you considering resigning? >> he is not resigning. he said his newspaper has been down to bring him -- has been out to bring him down. he attacks the way that it reported his youngest son was suffering from cystic fibro
on pbs and around the globe. each day brings a new twist in the scandal that has engulfed britain. today was no exception. first the news of the second high-profile resignations and scotland yard in 24 hours when john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former "news of the world" reporter that alleged widespread hacking was found dead. the circumstances are not believed to be suspicious. nick robinson reports. >> he resigned just a day after his boss, commissioner paul stephenson. both are paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal, so says the mayor of london. >> i have just come off of the phone with yates and tendered his resignation. >> insisted both men jumped and were not pushed. he made it clear he did everything to encourage them. >> there are issues and questions. it will make it difficult for them to continue to do their job in the way they wanted. >> john yates began the day determined not to resign. he told colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he explained why he was going. >> we are truly accountable. those of us to take on th
and fitter and not to be missed -- bitter and not to be missed. >> pressure continues to mount in britain. in the u.s., the fbi is closing allegations that news corp. tried to hack into the phone records of victims of the 9/11 attack. more on that border of the story -- part of the story. news corp. is headquartered in new york. the fbi seems to be bowing to pressure from politicians. >> that is right. what happened last night, a republican congressman from long island called on the fbi to open an investigation and two reports there was an attempt to obtain the phone records and numbers of the 9/11 victims, especially british victims and this attempt was made by "news of the world" reporters. this is the allegation. made in a rival newspaper. this is what it politicians want to have investigated. 9/11 is a totemic issue as we approach the 10th anniversary. people cannot believe this could be -- possibly have happened. i understand the investigation is in its preliminary stages. it does not mean a thing has done wrong but murdoch was a company is facing investigations on both sides of the
investors are looking at at the moment. the cultural cemetery of britain says he will not make a rush decision. we know he has written to regular -- written to regulators seeking advice. there's speculation that the takeover will be referred back to the competition commission, which could involve a lengthy investigation into whether mr. rupert murdoch, news corp., his management team would be proper to own bskyb. clegg made those comments a few moments ago. let's listen to what he said about this deal. >> the bskyb bid -- rupert murdoch is now in town in london. i would simply say to him -- look how people feel about this. look how the country has reacted with revulsion to the revelations'. do the decent and sensible thing and reconsider. think again about your bid for bskyb. >> you mentioned the share price of bskyb has been affected. not only bskyb. >> investors have seen a possible delayed the bid and a possible failed bid. the pressure on rupert murdoch. they are dumping some of their bskyb shares. it fell another 6% today. that's on the back of an 8% fall on friday. not too long
, but he started out in britain, as did harry n. john. the sounds of modern hollywood, not as american as you might think. >> amazing how important music is in film. that is it for now. plenty more to come on bbc. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put itsie global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, companies, what
defector. he says the general's death will make them more determined to push on to tripoli. britain gave its full backing to the rebel government, and the west hope they are right. >> tens of thousands of syrians have turned out again for protest across the country, demanding the president resigned. it has killed elise four people. the biggest rally appears to be in hamas. there was a report of of fighting in several other cities. here we have this report from damascus. >> people chant for the sake of god and we walk. people want the downfall of the regime. hear, the city that has witnessed the biggest conflict across the country, people have determined to they want the regime out. thousands of people took to the streets and decided that silence is killing us. -- here is a different scene. police used teargas to disperse protesters. this is it in a town that is a suburb of damascus. today, it blamed the past -- a blast for sabotage. using heavy helicopters where people were killed in the early hours of morning by security forces. they want to crack down on protests and it seems -- it doe
in britain as the phone hacking allegations continue to grow. john yates said he was wrong in 2009 not to reopen the investigation into phone hacking, but has acted with complete integrity. rupert murdoch alongside his son james murdoch and the chief executive of news international here in the u.k. will appear before parliamentary select committee at 2:30 u.k. time. you have been watching news on the bbc. thanks for watching. ♪ ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los presented by kcet los angeles.
, murdoch is much more dominant than in britain. hear, until about this absolutely pete, there was very little reporting about what was going on except for their competition. but they control most of the major newspapers outside of sydney and melbourne. his only real competition is in sydney and melbourne. it is a blanket coverage if they have. >> thank you for joining us, alan night from the university of technology in sydney. petrol bombs and bricks were thrown in belfast. officers used water cannons to control the crowd of up to 200 protesters on the night before the biggest day of the loyalists march. the latest from belfast. >> frankly, trouble had been expected but expected to come from the loyalist and the unionists and the protestant side of the community. it came and fat from the nationalist community, from a part of what that fast where they hijacked a bus, drove it don't -- drove it toward a police cordon designed to cape loyalists and republicans apart. they need to celebrate the highlight of the marching season bird on the 12th of july, and republicans have a standard becau
communications director, also the former editor of britain's biggest selling newspaper has been unveiled by police. the former u.s. first lady, betty ford, died at the age of 93. she was the wife of president gerald ford and served as first lady from 1974 to 1977. betty ford was best known for founding a leading california clinic for treating drug and i call addiction. president barack obama said she left a legacy of courage for others. >> ladies and gentlemen, president and mrs. gerald ford. >> gerald ford once said that he was indebted to no man and to only one woman, his wife betty ford. as first lady, she combined grace with candor, a candor that was tested just months after she moved into the white house when doctors discovered she had breast cancer and if -- and performed a mastectomy. her frank discussion about the ordeal is credited to learning women about the dangers of breast cancer. >> women are no longer ashamed of having mastectomies. they talk about it. i feel that i have saved many lives. >> she was known as betty plumber growing up in michigan and she dreamed of becoming
. they're all in place. everything is fine. we're not going back. >> britain's duke and duchess of cambridge celebrated canada day with thousands of people in the capital os awafment on the first day, prince william told the parliament on parliament hill he was excited of the prospect by coming part of the canadian family as they traveled around the country. from ottawa, we have this report. >> they are young and glamorous, which undoubtedly helps but to be a successful royal requires more. things like a sense of service and ability to connect with people, because that lifts them belong mere celebrity. william and kate arrived at the annual canada day celebration in a horse-drawn carriage. the crowds were large, the welcome once again enthusiastic. as the queen's representative in canada, the governor general mounted the podium, the crowd shouted for will and kate. they made their way to the stage giving the crowd a chance to see kate was wearing canada's national colors of red and white. canada's prime minister congratulated them on their marriage. the crowd cheered, dignitarie
sparked massive protest across the continent. britain has passed its own cost- cutting baggage. it comes after investors started to worry that the eurozone's third largest economy could be the next victim of the debt crisis. it goes to the lower house of parliament on friday. >> italy, ever aware of battles past, has been told it is now on the front line in the current battle over the eurozone crisis. the reason is that. -- the reason is debt. today, the italian senate debated an emergency austerity package, brought forward to calmed markets worried about italian debt. the italian finance minister told the senators the country was watching. he warned the public they could devour our future in the future of our children. passions ran high. public wages will now be frozen. the senate approved the measures and the italian parliament looks set to pass this budget in five days. >> we are reeling right now at the defense of the european currency. this is not against italy. it is against the eurozone. >> here is italy's problem. it is looking to make 42 billion pounds in savings over three year
at the heart of a very big, powerful organization, and maybe it extends across wider if journalism in britain. also affected are the police and politicians. there are some brave politicians saying now that politics should have been stronger on this issue. >> professor brian castcart there. the indian former minister arrived on wednesday for a three-day visit. he'll hold talks with officials from bangladesh on long standing issues. success there will pave the way for a high-profile visit by india's prime minister in september. our bangladesh correspondent there. >> india and bangladesh are supposed to be friendly neighbors, but they have a range of contentious issues, ranging from river waters to demarcation. the two south asian neighbors also shared more than 50 rivers, but bangladesh believes it's not getting enough water as india has built a number of dams upstream. the two sides are expected to reach an interim agreement on the water and the rivers during the visit of the india prime minister to bangladesh later this year. the two sides are also talking about giving transit access to each
sharma. lawmakers in britain will discuss the phone hacking scandal rocking news international. the court said they were partly to blame for the shevardnadze massacre. >> japan is to conduct tests on its nuclear plants. london.4:00 on this is "newsday." >> the british parliament has called an emergency debate about the phone hacking scandal surrounding news international. the action has prompted calls for a public inquiry. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians were informed their telephones had been hacked. now a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world hacked her phone while she was missing and some messages have been deleted in the process. david cameron and made his feelings clear cari >> if they are true, this is a dreadful act and a dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite shocking, that someone could do this, knowing that the police were trying to find this person and trying
of britain's biggest media empire, rupert murdoch, is to make his first appearance before a committee of british members of parliament on tuesday to face questioning about the phone hacking scandal at the "news of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul stevenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say i have just come off the phone john yates, who tendered his resignation. >> boras johnson said both men had jumped and were not pushed. but he made it clear he had done everything he could to encourage them. >> it is a concatenation of issues and questions. it is going to make it very difficult for them to continue to do their jobs in the way they wanted. >> yates began the day determined not to resign, telling colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he ended it explaining why he was go
. >> as the investigation gets under way, britain has promised intelligence cooperation. forensic, eyewitness accounts and telephone analysis will all be fed in. the unanswered questions are, who was behind this and why? >> richard capt. is on his way to the island of -- richard galpin is on his way to the island of utoeya. he filed this report. >> they fear there may be more bodies in the water. boats are searching. we know that when the gunmen opened fire on this island, there was huge panic. there's got to be something like 600-700 people who were on the island at the time. some of them took to the water and tried to swim away. there is a fear that more bodies will be found in the water. those in the red cross were saying to me that there may also be more victims inside the building where the bomb explosion took place in the mid afternoon here in central oslo because it is difficult for the emergency services to get inside the building. there is a concern that there might be more bombs in the area. there has been very significant damage to the building, so it is dangerous from that point of view fo
of cheap lit which are. -- literature. the plays, of course, when stowe landed in this britain, in liver pool in 1853 to visit britain, there were ten versions of "uncle tom's cabin" on stage in london on the day she landed. >> right. >> imagine that. so i think it's a fascinating, um, summary -- and i don't mean to simplify this -- summary of the impact of that book in so many ways. >> yeah. well, i can't really think of another novel, um, and i love so many novels, and i teach so many novels, and i love them all. but i can't think of another one that had the impact of "uncle tom's cabin." you know, where does one begin? it's now translated into over 70 languages, and every year even now new editions and new languages keep coming out. t just an incredible -- it's just an incredible international phenomenon. again, where do you begin? in russia there were 57 editions published there. well, first it was banned in russia because it was considered a subversive novel. but then in 1867 it was published and then 57 -- and it was lenin's favorite novel. and it directly influenced the emancipati
britain. and today was certainly no exception. first came the news of the second high-profile resignation in scotland yard in 24 hours when assistant commissioner john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former world news reporter who said high-spread hacking of the paper under then editor andy clausen was found dead. more on that in a moment. first the bbc's political editor nick robinson, has more on the many departures. >> he is yates of the yard no longer, resigning just a day after his boss. the commissioner of the metropolitan piece sir paul stephenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal, so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say i have just come off the phone to a.c. john yates, who tendered his resignation. i believe both decisions are regrettable but i'm afraid in both cases, the right call has been made. >> boris johnson insisted both men had jumped and were not pushed but made it abundantly clear he had done everything to encourage them. >> i think it became clear to john yates that the cackny of questions and circumstances
on a general basis that so far we don't have any evidence of another cell either in norway or in britain. >> for now, norway's focus is on the dead and those still missing. each evening the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all who have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> norway's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to breivik's attacks. there were questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the island where the killer went on the rampage. europe has been to the island and spoke to some of the rescuers. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are people still waiting with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a campsite in their small boats. they launch their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was that they don't trust us. they shout from the water, "can i trust you?
the home of the giants slowly being transformed into a soccer field. on saturday britain's manchester city will take on mexico's club america. it's part of the world football challenge. yesterday manchester city proudly showed off their championship trophy at the british consulate in san francisco. >>> today san francisco's board of supervisor will consider expanding -- supervisors will consider expanding the health care ordinance. right now most cities have to provide health care benefits or pay into a city fund to cover insurance for workers but some workers say their employers including many restaurants are finding a way around that law and they want the board to close that loophole. >>> time now 5:56. what's happening on the roads, especially san francisco now, sal? >> yeah, we do have the south bay of course we are watching, we have been watching 280 northbound, it has not been affected by any of the south bay sinkhole action on 87 near alma so you don't have to worry about. the sa nault grade traffic looks good. driving on the westbound bay bridge that traffic looks nice coming into
era of cheap literature. the plays, of course, once they landed in britain and liverpool in 1893, there were ten versions in london on the day she landed. imagine that. so i think it's a fascinating summary, and i don't mean to simplify the summary of that book in so many ways. >> yeah. well, i can't really think of another novel and i love so many novels and teach so many novels and love them all, but i can't think of another that had the impact of uncle tom's cabin. you know, where does one begin? it's now translated into over 70 languages, and every year even now new additions and -- new editions and new languages keep coming out. it's an up credible international phenomena. again, where do you begin? in russia, there's 57 editions published there. first, it was banned in russia because it was considered a subversive novel, but then in 1857 it was lennon's favorite novel and it laid behind the russian revolution, it was one of the influences of the russian revolution. anyway, as i was saying, the play went everywhere. in america, there's so many different versions of the play.
Search Results 76 to 108 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)

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